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Chateau (Civ5)

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Chateau
Chateau (Civ5)

The French unique improvement.

Worker improvement introduced in Brave New World

Requires

Chivalry (Civ5) Chivalry

Effect
  • +1 20xGold5 Gold
  • +2 20xCulture5 Culture
  • +50% defense bonus
  • +2 additional 20xGold5 Gold and +1 additional 20xCulture5 Culture after researching Flight
  • Must be built adjacent to a luxury resource and not adjacent to another Chateau
Improves

N/A

BackArrowGreen Back to the list of improvements

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Chateau

Chateau in game

Game InfoEdit

Unique improvement of the French civilization. Requires Chivalry.

  • Constructed on:
    • Tile next to a luxury resource. Cannot be constructed next to another Chateau. (Sea-based luxuries are also eligible, as long as they border land tiles.)
  • Effect:
    • +1 20xGold5 Gold (+3 with Flight).
    • +2 20xCulture5 Culture (+3 with Flight).
    • +50% Defensive bonus for any unit on that tile.

StrategyEdit

The primary use of the Chateau is to speed the French along their road to a cultural victory. 20xTourism5 Tourism can be generated based on the 20xCulture5 Culture of Chateaux with a Hotel, Airport, and/or a National Visitor Center. As an added benefit, your army may use Chateaux to defend your lands from invasions.

You should plan well where you intend to construct Chateaux. Since they don't cost 20xGold5 Gold, you can build as many as you want wherever you can. Still, positioning a Chateau strategically may also help you to defend your lands and/or position another Chateau or another improvement nearby.

Historical InfoEdit

A chateau is a manor house or country home of gentry, usually without fortifications. In the Middle Ages, a chateau was largely self-sufficient, being supported by the lord's demesne (hereditary lands). In the 1600s, the wealthy and aristocratic French lords dotted the countryside with elegant, luxuriant, architecturally refined mansions such as the Chateau de Maisons. Today, the term chateau is loosely used; for instance, it is common for any winery or inn, no matter how humble, to prefix its name with "Chateau."

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