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Civics (Civ6)

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Civics are a new concept in Civilization VI. They encompass the progress in a variety of non-military and non-scientific aspects of the game, allowing for a player to concentrate on things like cultural development and diplomacy, instead of just researching the latest military tech. Civics are the main way to develop advanced forms of government. There are 50 civics in the base game, with some not being needed to progress through to the end of the tree.

The Civics Tree Edit

Civics are organized in a research tree, very similar to the scientific technologies tree from previous games. We can actually say that the traditional Tech tree has been split in two in Civilization VI - the two parts being the two sides of the same coin, your civilization's development over time. Progressing through the technology tree requires Civ6Science ScienceScientific development, while progressing through the Civics tree requires Civ6Culture CultureCultural development. And just like your technological research, you are constantly developing a Civic, right from the start of the game. The boost mechanics for the Tech tree are also present for the Civics tree - each individual Civic may be boosted by fulfilling an Inspiration requirement, similar to eureka moments in the technology tree. For a list of individual civics, see below.

The main difference between the two trees (besides the way you progress through them) is in their concept, and the stuff they unlock. While the Technology tree offers military tech, and essential techs for dominating your surroundings, the Civics tree unlocks Social Policies (now called 'Policy Cards'), diplomatic options, and subtle military developments, such as formation bonuses, or the ability to combine units into Corps and Armies. We can say that the Civics tree offers roughly half the progress opportunities in the game, related to Culture and Diplomacy, while the Technological tree offers the progress through Military tech and rough Science.

It is now fully possible for a civilization to develop along Cultural lines, and still win the game without bothering with developing science. This allows for an entirely new focus in the game.

Developing each Civic will also unlock special new game items, called Policy Cards, which can be put together to form your civilization's Government agenda. In addition, Civics can unlock new units, buildings, districts, and wonders (although far fewer than the tech tree)..

Policy Cards Edit

The Policy Cards are the actual representations of the social orientation of your nation. Each Policy Card represents an effect, which is activated when you place the card in the respective slot in your Government. (For more info on how to do that, please see the Government article.). Policy Cards are unlocked via progress through the Civics Tree. For more information on them, check here.

The new system compared to the old system Edit

Civilization VI's Civics system, and more specifically, the Government system, is actually Civilization V's Social Policy system revamped and expanded. Compared to the older game, the new Government system offers much greater flexibility and the possibility to adjust your Social bonuses on-the-fly as the game offers you new challenges. Whereas Civilization V: Brave New World's system presented a more steady and predictable development, it locked you onto a specific path with little possibility for maneuvering. While arguably more powerful, individual Social Policies there were usually too focused into a specific field to allow a civilization to respond to all possible threads.

This is where Civilization VI's system really shines! While switching Governments is not that easy, switching individual Policies is very intuitive, and even if you do it only every several turns (when the free possibility presents itself with the development of a new Civic), you are still able to respond almost instantly to the ever-changing situation in the world. The four main types of Policies cover every aspect of the game, and offer ever-expanding variety of ways to tweak your bonuses: from simple yield-boosting Policies to Policies which depend on gameplay actions.

List of Civics in Civilization VI Edit

Ancient Era Edit

Classical Era Edit

Medieval Era Edit

Renaissance Era Edit

Industrial Era Edit

Modern Era Edit

Atomic Era Edit

Information Era Edit

Civilization VI [edit]

Lists
BeliefsBuildingsCity-StatesCivicsCivilizationsDistrictsLeadersImprovementsPolicy CardsPromotionsResourcesTechnologiesTerrainUnitsWonders

Concepts
AgendaAmenitiesBarbariansBordersCityContinentCultureDiplomacyEspionageEureka MomentFaithFoodGoldGossipGovernmentGreat PeopleGreat WorksMapMovementProductionReligionScienceTourismTrade RoutesTileVictoryWarmongering

Miscellaneous
DLCModdingSoundtrackStarting a new gameSteam AchievementsSteam trading cards

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