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local data = {}
data["Armory"] = {
        allows = {"Magazine"},
        pcost = 100,
	notes = [=[Allows 2 colonists to each produce 3 [[Guns (Civ4Col)|Guns]] from 3 [[Tools (Civ4Col)|Tools]] per turn.<br>Allows the construction of [[Artillery (Civ4Col)|Artillery]] and [[Cannon (Civ4Col)|Cannon]].]=],
        cp = [[An armory is a repository for firearms, cannon and other implements of destruction as well as a drill area for troops or militia. The creation of an armory was a near necessity for burgeoning colonies, as there was a constant need for firearms to defend against the attacks of wildlife or angered natives. And while invaluable to the survival of a nascent settlement, armories were usually sequestered away from the rest of a colony, in case a rough match or spark should drift in through their doors and cause the powder to catch, a lesson that more than a few young colonies were forced to learn the hard way.]]}
data["Arsenal"] = {
        reqbuilding = {"Magazine","Lumber Mill"},
        pcost = 900,
        tcost = 100,
	notes = [=[<nowiki>+</nowiki>50% Guns production. Allows 3 colonists to each produce 6 [[Guns (Civ4Col)|Guns]] from 6 [[Tools (Civ4Col)|Tools]] per turn.<br>Allows the construction of [[Artillery (Civ4Col)|Artillery]] and [[Cannon (Civ4Col)|Cannon]].]=],
        cp = [[Arsenals are enormous weapons factories, capable of producing arms at a rate sufficient enough to supply an entire colony! The United States, for example, had but one arsenal when it declared independence, only building a second in 1805. Arsenals, because of their strategic importance, were often among the first targets an enemy could be expected to attack. The arsenal in Springfield, Massachusetts, America's first arsenal, was marched on by Daniel Shay, a disgruntled Revolutionary War veteran, bent on halting the Constitutional Convention of 1786, before Shay's Rebellion was put down by federal troops. America's second Arsenal, built in Harper's Ferry, West Virginia, gained great renown when, in 1859, abolitionist John Brown attempted to seize its stockpile to strike a blow against slavery.]]}
data["Blacksmith's House"] = {
        allows = {"Blacksmith's Shop"},
	notes = [=[Allows 2 colonists to each produce 3 [[Tools (Civ4Col)|Tools]] from 3 [[Ore (Civ4Col)|Ore]] per turn.]=],
        cp = [[Due to the lack of foundries which could quickly create new metal objects, iron was an exceptionally precious metal in the early colonies. This made the blacksmith an essential part of any successful colony, as broken iron instruments could only be repaired or ordered new from England at great cost. But the blacksmith's job was not easy. Even working at the bare minimum, a blacksmith required an impressive amount of tools - tongs, hammers, bellows, anvil, trough and forge. As well, they needed a roof over their head, so that they could see the metal they were working had reached an appropriate temperature. The Blacksmith's House represents this invaluable, if meager, set-up. A skilled blacksmith can make just about anything a young colony could require with a Blacksmith's House, so long as he's given plenty of time to do the job.]]}
data["Blacksmith's Shop"] = {
        reqbuilding = {"Blacksmith's House"},
        allows = {"Ironworks"},
        pcost = 150,
        tcost = 50,
	notes = [=[Allows 3 colonists to each produce 6 [[Tools (Civ4Col)|Tools]] from 6 [[Ore (Civ4Col)|Ore]] per turn.]=],
        cp = [[Due to the lack of foundries which could quickly create new metal objects, iron was an exceptionally precious metal in the early colonies. This made the blacksmith an essential part of any successful colony, as broken iron instruments could only be repaired or ordered new from England at great cost. But the blacksmith's job was not easy. Even working at the bare minimum, a blacksmith required an impressive amount of tools - tongs, hammers, bellows, anvil, trough and forge. As well, they needed a roof over their head, so that they could see the metal they were working had reached an appropriate temperature. The Blacksmith's House represents this invaluable, if meager, set-up. A skilled blacksmith can make just about anything a young colony could require with a Blacksmith's House, so long as he's given plenty of time to do the job.]]}
data["Carpenter's Shop"] = {
        allows = {"Lumber Mill"},
	notes = [=[Allows 2 colonists to each produce 3 [[Hammer (Civ4)|Hammers]] from 3 [[Lumber (Civ4Col)|Lumber]] per turn.]=],
        cp = [[Due to the general lack of iron in the early colonies, the carpenter was the most important craftsman a town could have. Carpenters had the daunting task of fashioning from lumber many tools that would normally be made of iron, such as hinges, shovels and spades. But by the 18th century, the average carpenter had at hand a plethora of tools to perform the various tasks needed to aid in the construction of the growing colony. Saws and augers could be used in order to cut the wood and drill any holes needed to hold the pieces together. Squares, bevels and compasses were used to measure the level and angle of two pieces of wood. Finally, planes, chisels and drawknives could be used to whittle away the excess until the work was smooth and fit for human usage.]]}
data["Cathedral"] = {
        reqbuilding = {"Church"},
        pcost = 150,
        tcost = 50,
	notes = [=[Allows 3 colonists to each produce 6 [[Crosses (Civ4Col)|Crosses]] per turn.]=],
        cp = [[Cathedrals are enormous Catholic churches that usually denote the seat of an archbishop. In Colonization, Cathedrals simply represent a major seat of religious power, regardless of denomination. The earliest Cathedrals in the New World were built in the colonies of the Spanish and Portuguese. Construction of the West's first cathedral began in 1514, commissioned by Columbus himself on the island of Santo Domingo. The island's Cathedral was completed in 1540, and would become the first among many. North America, because of its largely Protestant population, did not build its first cathedral, the Baltimore Basilica, until 1806. In the 20th century, however, some of the largest cathedrals on Earth would be built in North America, including Saint Joseph's Oratory in Quebec and the Cathedral of St. John in New York.]]}
data["Church"] = {
        allows = {"Cathedral"},
        pcost = 50,
	notes = [=[Allows 2 colonists to each produce 3 [[Crosses (Civ4Col)|Crosses]] per turn.]=],
        cp = [[After basic shelter, the church was likely the most important building of any colony. Spanish and English colonists in particular carried with them significant religious fervor. Catholic monks traveling abroad in the name of God and country helped create many of New Spain's most important institutions, including numerous monasteries, cathedrals and the New World's first university. In the English colonies, Puritans, Quakers, and Catholics alike started new lives in order to worship in peace, bringing with them all shapes of new religious buildings.]]}
data["Cigar Factory"] = {
        reqbuilding = {"Tobacconist's Shop", "Lumber Mill"},
        pcost = 270,
        tcost = 100,
	notes = [=[<nowiki>+</nowiki>50% Cigar production.<br>Allows 3 colonists to each produce 6 [[Cigars (Civ4Col)|Cigars]] from 6 [[Tobacco (Civ4Col)|Tobacco]] per turn.<br><nowiki>+</nowiki>25% production of [[Liberty Bell (Civ4Col)|Liberty Bells]].]=],
        cp = [[While Virginia was known early on for the quality of its tobacco, and other locales soon developed similar renown for their own brands of smoked goods, nowhere contributed to the development of the cigar as much as Cuba. While stifled by the iron fist Spain asserted over their tobacco production, cigar factories eventually developed in Cuba, particularly on the island's western end, which became world renowned for the quality of its tobacco. Because of the manual dexterity required in expertly rolling a cigar, skilled laborers were often imported to ensure the quality of their product, which to this day remain some of the most sought-after cigars on the planet.]]}
data["Coat Factory"] = {
        reqbuilding = {"Fur Trading Post", "Lumber Mill"},
        pcost = 270,
        tcost = 100,
	notes = [=[<nowiki>+</nowiki>50% Coats production.<br>Allows 3 colonists to each produce 6 [[Coats (Civ4Col)|Coats]] from 6 [[Furs (Civ4Col)|Furs]] per turn.<br><nowiki>+</nowiki>25% production of [[Liberty Bell (Civ4Col)|Liberty Bells]].]=],
        cp = [[Every Coat Factory owner had one major ace up his sleeve - fashion. It was not just the citizens of chilly New England and Quebec that wanted well-tailored - if heavy - coats, but also those of the southern and Caribbean colonies as well. Thanks to the ever-pressing requirements of fashion, English colonists living in Barbados simply ''had'' to have the fashions that were being worn so proudly (and more logically) in New England. Many were the confused European native who, arriving in the sweltering heat of the Caribbean, found their hosts in full gentlemen's (or gentlewoman's) garb. Yet the benefit for the producer of such fashions was endless.]]}
data["College"] = {
        reqbuilding = {"Schoolhouse"},
        allows = {"University"},
        pcost = 150,
        tcost = 50,
	notes = [=[Allows 3 colonists to each produce 6 [[Education (Civ4Col)|Education]] per turn.]=],
        cp = [[A college is an institution of higher learning, although the exact meaning of the word differs greatly based on the culture which is using it. In the English system of education, colleges are often specialized institutions that make up a university. Oxford University, England's most prestigious university, had 17 individual colleges by 1610. The English college system would be adopted by her colonies in the New World, and by 1636, North America had its first college, Harvard College, which, with time and investment, grew to become the world's most renowned university.]]}
data["Dock"] = {
        allows = {"Drydock"},
        pcost = 25,
	notes = [=[<nowiki>+</nowiki>2 food on water tiles.]=],
        cp = [[Ships large enough to carry the 50 to 100 people needed to found a colony along with all the supplies and food necessary to keep those colonists alive could not make landfall just anywhere. Because of the significant depth of their keels, such ships had to either carry all their contents in smaller row boats or search for a natural harbor, a portion of coast where the water adjacent the land was deep. Building a dock, a long wooden walkway stretching into the sea, could allow ships to make landfall in areas that lacked a natural harbor. Soon the east coast of the Americas was littered with docks as more and more massive ships arrived carrying their colonial cargos.]]}
data["Drydock"] = {
        reqbuilding = {"Dock"},
        allows = {"Shipyard"},
        pcost = 75,
        tcost = 50,
	notes = [=[<nowiki>+</nowiki>2 food on water tiles<br>Required to build [[Caravel (Civ4Col)|Caravel]], [[Privateer (Civ4Col)|Privateer]], and [[Merchantman (Civ4Col)|Merchantman]].]=],
        cp = [[Drydocks are short canals that allow for easy repairs to a colony's navy. The most important feature of the drydock is that once a ship is properly positioned within the dock, the water can be drained, allowing craftsmen to easily access the hull of the ship without first having to learn how to breathe water. While there is debate as to when the idea for the first drydock arose, the world's earliest working drydock was built by King Henry VIII in 1495. And while advances in technology would continue to improve the drydock over the next several hundred years, the concept remains unchanged since its colonial-era inception.]]}
data["Fort"] = {
        reqbuilding = {"Stockade"},
        allows = {"Fortress"},
        pcost = 90,
        tcost = 50,
	notes = [=[<nowiki>+</nowiki>100% settlement defense.]=],
        cp = [[While the European cities of South and Central America were in large part built upon the ruins of native settlements, many cities of the North American frontier began their days as forts. More than simple stockades, forts were large enough to house the workings of entire cities within their protective borders. Often planted as outposts in frontier territories, many forts became centers of economy for the North American interior. Such was the case for Fort Pitt and Fort Quebec, both of which blossomed into major metropolises. Today Pittsburgh and Quebec City remain among the most influential metropolises in their respective regions.]]}
data["Fortress"] = {
        reqbuilding = {"Fort","Lumber Mill"},
        pcost = 270,
        tcost = 100,
	notes = [=[<nowiki>+</nowiki>150% settlement defense.]=],
        cp = [[Fortresses are massive defensive structures, capable of housing dozens of cannon, hundreds of men, as well as supplies, munitions and barracks. Fortresses were most often built in areas of high conflict between the various colonial powers. For this reason, no area has a higher concentration of fortresses in the New World than the Caribbean. To defend against the assaults of opposing colonies as well as the occasional pirate raid, many major colonial settlements of the Caribbean built enormous defense structures around their harbors in order to protect them against enemy naval incursions. Many of these fortresses were used for hundreds of years after their construction. The Castillo de San Pedro de la Roca in Cuba was used as recently as 1898 to defend Cuba from the assaults of the United States during the Spanish-American War.]]}
data["Fur Trader's House"] = {
        allows = {"Fur Trading Post"},
	notes = [=[Allows 2 colonists to each produce 3 [[Coats (Civ4Col)|Coats]] from 3 [[Furs (Civ4Col)|Furs]] per turn.]=],
        cp = [[The skilled coat maker had to be part craftsman, part fashion designer, and had to be familiar with the tastes and attitudes their fellow settlers had towards the role of clothing. In many early English colonies, Puritanical ideas of fashion ruled. Furs were transformed into simple overcoats or cloaks with little adornment. Buttons were considered unacceptable flair to the Puritan mindset, so any coat maker hoping to sell his wares in a Puritan settlement had to be adept at adding hooks and latches to their wares that could hold out the American cold, but not appear "vain."]]}
data["Fur Trading Post"] = {
        reqbuilding = {"Fur Trader's House"},
        allows = {"Coat Factory"},
        pcost = 90,
        tcost = 50,
	notes = [=[Allows 3 colonists to each produce 6 [[Coats (Civ4Col)|Coats]] from 6 [[Furs (Civ4Col)|Furs]] per turn.]=],
        cp = [[Fur Trading Posts often sprouted along the edges of the frontier to act as shops and gathering places for trappers returning from the hunt. These posts, if well-located, often blossomed into centers of economy. Modern cities such as Quebec and Albany, New York, today provincial capitals, began their years as fur trading posts.]]}
data["Horse Pasture"] = {
        allows = {"Ranch"},
	notes = [=[Unique building for [[Natives (Civ4Col)|Natives]].<br>Allows 2 colonists to each produce 2 [[Horses (Civ4Col)|Horses]] from 2 Food per turn.<br>+100% Horses production.]=],
        cp = [[Prior to the arrival of the Europeans, there were few stock animals in the New World. The largest domesticated animal in the Americas - the llama - weighed only about 300 pounds (136 kg) which greatly limited its ability to carry heavy loads. Horses and oxen, brought across the Atlantic as early as the beginning of the 16th century, would become invaluable tools in the transformation of the New World landscape. Oxen were employed in much of the heavy-lifting involved in clearing forests for fields and pastures, while horses served as speedy modes of transportation and weapons of war.]]}
data["Ironworks"] = {
        reqbuilding = {"Blacksmith's Shop","Lumber Mill"},
        pcost = 450,
        tcost = 100,
	notes = [=[<nowiki>+</nowiki>50% Tools production.<br>Allows 3 colonists to each produce 6 [[Tools (Civ4Col)|Tools]] from 6 [[Ore (Civ4Col)|Ore]] per turn.<br><nowiki>+</nowiki>25% production of [[Liberty Bell (Civ4Col)|Liberty Bells]].]=],
        cp = [[For the first century of colonization, sufficient iron was a rare and valued commodity that could only be obtained through trade with Europe. North America, however, thanks to its substantial, yet largely untapped iron reserves, would become the heart of the world iron industry. Starting with New England's Lynn Ironworks, built in the mid-1640s, North America grew to become a renowned producer of iron - and eventually steel. By the early 1800s, the ironworks of the United States were among the most productive in the world and 100 years later, were ''the'' most productive.]]}
data["Lumber Mill"] = {
        reqbuilding = {"Carpenter's Shop"},
        allows = {"Fortress","Shipyard","Textile Mill","Coat Factory","Rum Factory","Cigar Factory","Ironworks","Arsenal","University","Warehouse Expansion"},
        pcost = 150,
        tcost = 80,
	notes = [=[Allows 3 colonists to each produce 6 [[Hammer (Civ4)|Hammers]] from 6 [[Lumber (Civ4Col)|Lumber]] per turn.]=],
        cp = [[The sheer abundance of lumber in North America made lumber mills one of the earliest industrialized buildings to be created in the colonies. Prior to the construction of the first lumber mills, it was often necessary to balance extremely long pieces of timber on the edges of pits or gulleys in order to properly prepare the wood, which proved to be a slow and dangerous process. Beginning in the 1640s, across the eastern coast of North America, rivers, creeks, and streams were dammed in order to power the many mills cropping up across the continent. In the American South, many plantations, because of their high demand for fresh timber, had their own lumber mills which could run nearly unmanned. This allowed the plantation's labor to focus on the collection of cotton or tobacco rather than sawing wood.]]}
data["Magazine"] = {
        reqbuilding = {"Armory"},
        allows = {"Arsenal"},
        pcost = 300,
        tcost = 50,
	notes = [=[Allows 3 colonists to each produce 6 [[Guns (Civ4Col)|Guns]] from 6 [[Tools (Civ4Col)|Tools]] per turn.<br>Allows the construction of [[Artillery (Civ4Col)|Artillery]] and [[Cannon (Civ4Col)|Cannon]].]=],
        cp = [[Magazines were vast storehouses capable of holding arms, munitions and the personnel charged with maintaining them comfortably inside. Beyond a mere colonial munitions depot, magazines also were often storehouses for naval munitions as well, meaning they had to be enormous, well-enforced buildings. It is thought that once firearms became capable of firing more than single shots, the magazine, the case in which multiple bullets were held, was named for these storage facilities.]]}
data["Newspaper"] = {
        reqbuilding = {"Printing Press"},
        pcost = 180,
        tcost = 50,
	notes = [=[<nowiki>+</nowiki>100% production of [[Liberty Bell (Civ4Col)|Liberty Bells]].]=],
        cp = [[The English colonial city of Boston became a hotbed for the creation of America's earliest newspapers. "Publick Occurrences Both Forreign and Domestick" published by Benjamin Harris, the New World's first newspaper, was also one of its least successful, and lasted only four days before being shut down for speaking ill of royal soldiers stationed in Boston. Several years later, a new paper, one far more interested in the political and social life of England than in the colonies, entered into circulation around Boston. This paper, "The Boston News-Letter" riled the city's colonial masters far less and ran successfully for decades.]]}
data["Printing Press"] = {
        allows = {"Newspaper"},
        pcost = 60,
        tcost = 20,
	notes = [=[<nowiki>+</nowiki>50% production of [[Liberty Bell (Civ4Col)|Liberty Bells]].]=],
        cp = [[Despite their complicated mechanical nature, printing presses arrived in the New World within 50 years of Columbus' discovery. The Spanish were the first to transport printing presses across the seas and because many conquistadors were illiterate, the machines soon became the tools of the droves of Spanish monks arriving in the Americas. By the 18th century, printing presses had begun to arrive in North America as well. Benjamin Harris was one of the earliest publishers to set up shop in the North, creating a series of textbooks that would become the standard of American education. Later publishers would make their fortunes by reprinting the literary works of their home countries. Authors of the New World would have to wait until the 19th century before their work was recognized as having any merit.]]}
data["Ranch"] = {
        reqbuilding = {"Stable"},
        pcost = 90,
	notes = [=[Allows 3 colonists to each produce 3 [[Horses (Civ4Col)|Horses]] from 3 Food per turn.<br>Costs 100 Horses to build.]=],
        cp = [[As horses became a staple of the New World, both among Europeans and among the natives, a variety of distinctly New World breeds began to emerge. Some breeds, such as the Peruvian Paso, were valued for their ability to perform difficult work in harsh climates - in this breed's case the thin air of the Andes. Others, such as the Painted Horse, became symbols of native resistance and were used extensively against encroaching Europeans.]]}
data["Rum Distiller's House"] = {
        allows = {"Rum Distillery"},
	notes = [=[Allows 2 colonists to each produce 3 [[Rum (Civ4Col)|Rum]] from 3 [[Sugar (Civ4Col)|Sugar]] per turn.]=],
        cp = [[Prior to the invention of rum in the mid-17th century, molasses, the sickly-sweet liquid used to produce the liquor, was considered waste and great quantities of it were simply discarded. When it was discovered that molasses, along with many other byproducts of sugar processing, could be combined in a great still, fermented and turned into a beverage enjoyable to the masses, many Caribbean sugar planters leapt at the chance to install stills in their plantations. While crude at first, the distillation of rum quickly became an artform, with numerous tricks to creating the perfect batch.]]}
data["Rum Distillery"] = {
        reqbuilding = {"Rum Distiller's House"},
        allows = {"Rum Factory"},
        pcost = 90,
        tcost = 50,
	notes = [=[Allows 3 colonists to each produce 6 [[Rum (Civ4Col)|Rum]] from 6 [[Sugar (Civ4Col)|Sugar]] per turn.]=],
        cp = [[While sugar cane was grown primarily in Brazil and the Caribbean and was first distilled there as well, New England soon became the heart of rum production in the New World. With the development of numerous distillery houses throughout New England in the mid-17th century, rum became the primary imbibe of the English colonies. The overwhelming success of rum in North America was in part because the spirit was thought to have medicinal properties, as when colonists switched from drinking water (which was often tainted with foreign bacteria) to drinking rum, they enjoyed noticeably longer lives.]]}
data["Rum Factory"] = {
        reqbuilding = {"Rum Distillery"},
        pcost = 270,
        tcost = 100,
	notes = [=[<nowiki>+</nowiki>50% Rum production.<br>Allows 3 colonists to each produce 6 [[Rum (Civ4Col)|Rum]] from 6 [[Sugar (Civ4Col)|Sugar]] per turn.<br>+25% production of [[Liberty Bell (Civ4Col)|Liberty Bells]].]=],
        cp = [[By the late 18th century and through to the mid-19th, rum was a phenomenon. Rum drinkers could be found on every continent that touched the Atlantic. In parts of Africa and England, the spirit was actually used as currency. As the popularity of rum grew, so too did its production. In the Caribbean, dozens of distilleries on numerous islands were producing the liquor. Many elder distilleries added additional stills to increase production. Numerous distilleries created in this era remain famous to this day, including Mount Gilboa, today known as Mount Gay, and the distillery founded by Facundo Bacardi which bears his name.]]}
data["Schoolhouse"] = {
        allows = {"College"},
        pcost = 50,
	notes = [=[Allows 2 colonists to each produce 3 [[Education (Civ4Col)|Education]] per turn.]=],
        cp = [[In the majority of the colonies of the New World, education was a paramount concern, not necessarily to aid in the exploration of natural phenomena, but to train new priests. The first university in the New World actually started off as an abbey with just that goal. Most students, however, would not progress all the way through their lessons, instead dropping out after learning to read and write. The tools of education were just as rare and therefore precious as those in any other trade in the New World, often being handed down from family member to family member. Hornbooks, small, handheld pieces of wood adorned with the alphabet were extremely popular in schools in the English colonies, but were soon displaced with the arrival of the printing press. One of the first books to be printed in the New World was a series of textbooks to educate the young.]]}
data["Shipyard"] = {
        reqbuilding = {"Drydock","Lumber Mill"},
        pcost = 225,
        tcost = 100,
	notes = [=[<nowiki>+</nowiki>2 food on water tiles<br>Required to build [[Frigate (Civ4Col)|Frigate]] and [[Ship of the Line (Civ4Col)|Ship of the Line]].]=],
        cp = [[Shipyards, large industrial areas where ocean-going craft could be constructed, required an enormous investment of labor and infrastructure to create. For this reason, shipyards did not become a salient part of the New World industrial landscape until the late 18th and early 19th centuries. But ships made in the New World, especially in the English colonies, soon became extremely popular. The abundance of resources in the Americas meant ships usually cost a third of what they would in Europe. By the mid-19th century, the New World ships featured prominently in navies and merchant fleets around the world.]]}
data["Stable"] = {
        allows = {"Ranch"},
        pcost = 30,
	notes = [=[Allows 2 colonists to each produce 2 [[Horses (Civ4Col)|Horses]] from 2 Food per turn.<br>Costs 50 Horses to build.]=],
        cp = [[Prior to the arrival of the Europeans, there were few stock animals in the New World. The largest domesticated animal in the Americas - the llama - weighed only about 300 pounds (136 kg) which greatly limited its ability to carry heavy loads. Horses and oxen, brought across the Atlantic as early as the beginning of the 16th century, would become invaluable tools in the transformation of the New World landscape. Oxen were employed in much of the heavy-lifting involved in clearing forests for fields and pastures, while horses served as speedy modes of transportation and weapons of war.]]}
data["Stockade"] = {
        allows = {"Fort"},
        pcost = 30,
	notes = [=[<nowiki>+</nowiki>50% settlement defense.]=],
        cp = [[Stockades, large stretches of wooden or stone walls built to protect a settlement, were an early necessity for many burgeoning colonies. Effective stockades could be made of a variety of materials. In North America, where strong timber was common, stockades were made almost exclusively by sheering the branches from tall trees and planting the remaining logs side by side around a settlement. In the Caribbean, where the wood was of a lesser quality, earthen stockades could be built into the sides of hills to guard against enemy attacks.]]}
data["Textile Mill"] = {
        reqbuilding = {"Weaver's Shop"},
        pcost = 270,
        tcost = 100,
	notes = [=[<nowiki>+</nowiki>50% Cloth production.<br>Allows 3 colonists to each produce 6 [[Cloth (Civ4Col)|Cloth]] from 6 [[Cotton (Civ4Col)|Cotton]] per turn.<br>+25% production of [[Liberty Bell (Civ4Col)|Liberty Bells]].]=],
        cp = [[The textile industry was experiencing a revolution at the end of the 18th century. In 1768, Richard Arkwright had invented a spinning wheel that could be powered by a waterwheel. If properly installed, a single waterwheel could power dozens of "water frames" as they became known, turning a single mill with a waterwheel into a highly profitable factory. With the invention of the cotton gin 25 years later, textile mills would begin to litter the North American landscape, as abundant cotton cloth flooded the European markets, turning the United States into the most significant producer of textiles on Earth.]]}
data["Tobacconist's House"] = {
        allows = {"Tobacconist's Shop"},
	notes = [=[Allows 2 colonists to each produce 3 [[Cigars (Civ4Col)|Cigars]] from 3 [[Tobacco (Civ4Col)|Tobacco]] per turn.]=],
        cp = [[While tobacco was also grown in the Caribbean and South America, few climates favored the plant quite like Virginia. So popular was the tobacco of the North America that even tobacco growers elsewhere in the world imported Virginia's stock. Because of the ease from which a profit could be made, a plethora of small tobacco farms cropped up throughout the mid-Atlantic region. These small tobacconists, also known as "oronookos," named for the type of tobacco they planted, were small scale producers of the plant, usually working alone to plant, harvest, dry and process their wares.]]}
data["Tobacconist's Shop"] = {
        reqbuilding = {"Tobacconist's House"},
        allows = {"Cigar Factory"},
        pcost = 90,
        tcost = 50,
	notes = [=[Allows 3 colonists to each produce 6 [[Cigars (Civ4Col)|Cigars]] from 6 [[Tobacco (Civ4Col)|Tobacco]] per turn.]=],
        cp = [[The art of creating fine cigars was adopted by Europeans from the natives, who regularly smoked their tobacco in a rolled form. By the 18th century, Cuba had become the center of the cigar trade in the New World. The art then traveled outwards, reaching the English colonies in 1762. The English colonists, who had previously only smoked from pipes, soon adopted the cigar as their preferred methods of smoking. By the 19th century, cigar rolling had established itself as a new industry on the mainland.]]}
data["Town Hall"] = {
	notes = [=[A colonist working here will produce [[Liberty Bell (Civ4Col)|Liberty Bells]].]=],
        cp = [[The styles of government of the European colonies varied widely from one another, leading to the creation of a medley of different styles of town halls. The Dutch and English colonies, both founded by citizens of nations with long histories of government participation, often created meeting halls where citizens could gather and discuss current issues. By 1619, English colonists had organized the first elected white legislature in the New World. The French colonies too were ruled by council, although with significantly more oversight from the representatives of power of the mother land. The strong monarchy of Spain led her colonies towards a more autocratic style of rule. As a result, the government offices of New Spain were often the quarters of the colony's crown-appointed governors.]]}
data["University"] = {
        reqbuilding = {"College","Lumber Mill"},
        pcost = 450,
        tcost = 100,
	notes = [=[Allows 3 colonists to each produce 12 [[Education (Civ4Col)|Education]] per turn.<br><nowiki>+</nowiki>25% production of [[Liberty Bell (Civ4Col)|Liberty Bells]].]=],
        cp = [[By 1538, little over forty years after Columbus first made landfall in the New World, a group of Spanish Dominican monks founded what would become the first university in the Americas. The University of Santo Domingo was the first of many grand bodies of higher education that would develop across the hemisphere. The first college in North America to become a university was Virginia's College of William and Mary, which increased its status in 1779. Other colleges, including one in Massachusetts named for its patron, John Harvard, would develop into some of the world's premier universities.]]}
data["Warehouse"] = {
        allows = {"Warehouse Expansion"},
        pcost = 30,
	notes = [=[<nowiki>+</nowiki>100 goods storage.]=],
        cp = [[Warehouses were large storage facilities, used by a community to store excess food stuffs, tools and other necessities. In many colonial societies, when large scale buildings like warehouses or barns needed to be constructed, parties would often be thrown in order to encourage community participation. Families would come with food and drink, feasting as they cut and raised the building. This practice can still be seen in select communities in North America, especially the Mennonite communities of Pennsylvania.]]}
data["Warehouse Expansion"] = {
        reqbuilding = {"Warehouse","Lumber Mill"},
        pcost = 90,
        tcost = 20,
	notes = [=[<nowiki>+</nowiki>200 goods storage.<br>Goods over storage capacity are sold at 50% of the price in Europe.]=],
        cp = [[The productive capabilities of the New World were a shock to many. By the tail end of the 1700s, colonies in the New World had become leaders in the production of cotton, rum, sugar, tobacco and gold. In response to the explosion of commerce, new infrastructure was continually being built in the New World's major port cities. Philadelphia, Havana, Boston, New Amsterdam all were littered with warehouses built to protect the new wealth of the colonies.]]}
data["Weaver's House"] = {
        allows = {"Weaver's Shop"},
	notes = [=[Allows 2 colonists to each produce 3 [[Cloth (Civ4Col)|Cloth]] from 3 [[Cotton (Civ4Col)|Cotton]] per turn.]=],
        cp = [[As with many trades in the New World, weaving began as something practiced only in the home for the benefit of one's self and family, but eventually expanded into a highly profitable industry. And while skill and training were certainly necessities for any successful weaver, the true mark of the trade was the possession of a loom. Without one, weaving was a far more time consuming process, requiring numerous helpers to hold the various threads in place. In the early ages of the colonies, only wool and flax were abundant enough to make commercially viable cloth. But by the mid-1700s, the invention of the cotton gin made that fiber cheap enough to replace both wool and flax as the primary source of North America's cloth.]]}
data["Weaver's Shop"] = {
        reqbuilding = {"Weaver's House"},
        allows = {"Textile Mill"},
        pcost = 90,
        tcost = 50,
	notes = [=[Allows 3 colonists to each produce 6 [[Cloth (Civ4Col)|Cloth]] from 6 [[Cotton (Civ4Col)|Cotton]] per turn.]=],
        cp = [[Even with a contemporary loom, weaving could be an extremely complicated process, especially when your client wanted something a little more showy. Adding patterns to cloth required many hands, great precision and a specifically-designed loom. In the early English colonies, weavers in great part lucked out. Fashions were drab, colored simply, and required no pattern. But as the tastes and fortunes of the New World citizens matured, they sought to express their wealth in a variety of ways, including their clothing, and weavers were forced to adapt to the new tastes.]]}
 
return data

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