FANDOM


BackArrowGreen Back to tile improvements

Fair-use-wikipedia-logo
Wikipedia has a page called:


The Stepwell is a unique tile improvement of the Indian civilization in Civilization VI. It cannot be built on Hills or adjacent to another Stepwell.

StrategyEdit

Stepwells are most effective when adjacent to both a Farm and a Holy Site. A yield of +2 Civ6Food Food, +1 Civ6Faith Faith and +1 Housing6 Housing is a strong yield in the Ancient Era, when they first become available. Even with just Farm adjacency, +2 Civ6Food Food and +1 Housing6 Housing is exactly twice as good a bonus as offered by a Farm until Feudalism is researched.

The Housing6 Housing bonus is particularly helpful. Most tile improvements such as Farms and Camps only provide +0.5 Housing6 Housing; Stepwells providing +1 means you can grow cities to much larger sizes much sooner. Once you have Sanitation in the Industrial Era, they'll offer +2 Housing6 Housing - as much as a Sewer - reducing your need for Neighborhoods.

By the time both Feudalism and Replaceable Parts are researched, the Civ6Food Food output of Farms will greatly surpass that of Stepwells. However, their far greater Housing6 Housing bonus means that you should still feel free to build them if you have the space.

Civilopedia entry Edit

A "stepwell" is a well or pool that can be reached by a set of steps. Although found in other regions, stepwells (known by a variety of names) are prevalent in India and Southeast Asia. The first rock-cut stepwells in India date from around 200 BC, and by 600 AD they were common throughout the Gujarat region; scholars believe that "cylindrical brick-lined wells" were a product of the early Bronze Age Indus Valley civilization. Many of the ancient Indian settlements had stepwells, and the elaborate ornamentation – some as detailed as those of any Hindu temple – show they were highly thought of by the citizenry. Not surprising, given the scarcity of clean water in the area. Alas, the British overseers of the Raj found the hygiene of the wells less than desirable, and so installed pumps and pipes to replace the stepwells in their holdings. Far less picturesque, but certainly more efficient.

Gallery Edit